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>>An English garden for the English-speaking class...

11 octobre 2011
Auteur(e) : 

Yorkie was pleased to be carried around by Sana...

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He had such a lovely summer in foreign countries...

It was nice for him to go and see a...

GARDEN OF SCULPTURES IN VALENCIENNES

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Nora and Elisabeth report :

"On Tuesday, September 20th the English speaking class of Mme Shrubsall went to see an exhibition on gardens in front of Valenciennes shopping centre.

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This year the garden was inspired by English gardens but last year it was on Japanese gardens.

Click here to see last year’s article.

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There were a lot of small fountains and the main elements were stone, metal, water and of course vegetal.

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We had a guide who explained about all the parts of the garden

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and he explained how to make your own fountain but there were real fountains too (Black stones with a hole with water going out)."

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SHUNTA tells you about his favourite plant in the exhibition

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Mock orange, also known as Mexican orange blossom

WHERE DOES IT GROW AND IN WHICH CONDITIONS ?

Mock orange, also known as Mexican orange blossom, grows in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate climates. Mock orange is hardy with minimal damage down to temperatures as low as -15 degrees Celsius ; however, some branches will suffer frost damage at these low temperatures. Remove all branches with frost damage. Mock orange requires a sunny location out of cold winds for optimum growth and appearances.

DOES IT FLOWER ?

The small white flowers are fragrant and resemble the scent of orange blossoms.

HOW TALL DOES IT GROW ?

This shrub grows up to 1 metre tall but you can prune it to keep it smaller. Mock orange is tolerant of heavy pruning, if necessary, it can be cut all the way to the ground.

If you want to know more you can click here.

SEBASTIAN tells you about his favourite plant in the exhibition

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Miscanthus sinensis ‘zebrinus’

Miscanthus is a deciduous, perennial grass.

In autumn, Miscanthus zebrinus may carry awned, hairy, pink-white sipkelets in fan-shaped panicles.

-  Common Name : Zebra grass

-  Exposure : full sun, partial shade

-  Hardiness : hardy

-  Soil type : clay/heavy, dry, moist, sandy

-  Height : 1,2m

-  Spread : 0,9m

-  Flowering period : August to September

It is an extraordinary plant. You normally cut the old growth down to the ground in late winter. New growth then appears in the spring, but is clear green. It grows for several months, and then, just as you’re thinking you’ll need to pull it out because it must have reverted, the yellow stripes appear. Not only on new growth as you might expect, but along the full length of the foliage.

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From mid-summer until autumn you’ll enjoy an increasingly bold clump of lovely, vigorous, yellow-striped foliage. Flowers appear in the autumn, and last right through winter.

Follow this link to read more about Miscanthus zebrinus.

SANA tells you about the way to get a nice lawn quickly...

with some help from SHUNTA

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We saw the lawn that had just been put for the display. Do you know how you can get a lawn very quickly ? .

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-  Level the ground,removing big stones. .

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-  Walk up and down on it, taking heavy steps.

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-  Lay the turves on the soil like brickwork. Use a knife to cut the turves to the shape you want.

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-  Bang the turves all over with the back of the rake.

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-  It will take a few weeks to settle.

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Follow this link to see videos and get more details

Elisabeth and Nora tell you about a special hydrangea

-   the vanilla-strawberry hydrangea

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Follow this link to see more about this hydrangea

Sebastian tells you about a special hotel we saw in the garden

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We saw a hotel for bugs. They settle in spring. One part is for ladybirds to shelter and lay eggs that hatch and then the babies and parents catch the green flies in the garden.

Another part is for bees to make honey.

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